Tuesday, April 5, 2016

Well Damn

The starting fluid fire trick didn't work!  It started a fire, but not enough air to set the bead.  I'll post a video later.

Went to three tire shops and none would touch it because of liability.  So, I ordered a bead seater that operates on 100 psi and the beads are so close together that didn't work either.


Not willing to concede, I cut some four inch blocks to spread the beads.  Hoping the ninety degree weather holds for a few days of baking in the sun.  My thoughts are it will allow the tire to soften and reshape itself, hopefully allowing the beads to spread far enough to allow the tire to inflate.
 

Running out of options here.  Any suggestions?

6 comments :

  1. Use a tube? I know that wasn't part of the plan but if the rim wasn't designed to be tubeless then it wouldn't hold the bead on in case of a blowout. Different rim profile. Nothing says you can't run a tube in a tubeless tire it's just less convenient to repair. You'll still get the tire life benefit.

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  2. RichardM; I might have to, but it will be a last resort. I'm still hard headed.

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  3. I've been following your tire trials with interest, but I have to say I'm kind of with Richard on this one. Even if you do somehow get it to seat, what happens if you have to repair a flat on the road? I'd also be concerned of it coming off the beat if the tire pressure dropped.

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  4. David; Thanks for following along. My researching this topic is what gave me hope that tubeless is doable. The efforts to date on getting the tire to seat is a problem that I hadn't seen anyone discuss. Not knowing if it is common or not is troubling, but I am still willing to give it a try. By being on 3 wheels it isn't as dangerous as if on 2. I think posting the entire process, good or bad, is more of an honest view of what is necessary and helpful for anyone who wonders if it can really be done.

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  5. How about running a tube, but with a twist. Drill a second hole in the rim for another valve stem. One to run the tube stem through, the other for the tubeless set up. Use the tube to inflate the tire and seat the bead. Then deflate and use the tubeless stem to bring tire to pressure. You may need to leave a little pressure in the tube to keep it in place so balancing remains stable. Plus if you get a flat, the inner tube may be fine...simply inflate fully.

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  6. Boudha; Interesting, but I believe it is an either or deal. Thanks for the input!

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